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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
stood here as your new governor wisconsin was facing a $3.6 billion budget deficit. property taxes had gone up 27% over the previous decade, increasing every year and the unemployment rate was 7.8%. today wisconsin has a $34 million surplus. property taxes on median value home went down each. last two years the unemployment rate, well, it is down to 6.7%. [applause] we're turning things around. we're heading in the right direction. we're moving wisconsin forward. and unlike other states we avoided significant tax increases, massive layoffs and cuts in programs like medicaid. instead we put in place long-term structural reforms that helped us balance state and local government budgets for years to come. what we did was think more about the next generation than we did about the next election and it worked. but the first time in our state's history we set machine any aside in two consecutive years for the rainy day fund. our bond rating is solid and our pension system is the only one in the country that is fully funded. [applause] we made tough but prudent decisions to get our fiscal hous
is president obama really cares about the deficit. if there is something he noticed in the first two years when the economic crisis had to be front and center, the thing he wanted to deal with was the long-run deficit. the idea that he went on a spending binge if you don't make threats like that is crazy. the evidence is there that he put spending cuts on the table. he asked them for them to be paired with tax increases as well. there is more good will than people realize. more agreement that we have such a big budget problem that will we're going to fire on all cylinders. we have to cut spending. frankly, we have raise more revenue. >> you're listening to the california program and our speakers are economic experts. we are discussing national, regional, and global economic challenges. you can find video online. there's a series of questions around employment and job growth. what what is your outlook on job growth? >> i will start. i think -- i will say i was here last year and i'm more optimistic this year than last year. we made a significant amount of progress. it looks like housing prices h
said this, when i think back myself of may 2010 when the u.k. deficit was at 11%, when you were in office, right? and i tried to imagine what the situation would be like today if no such fiscal consolidation program had been decided, i shiver. that is what the i.m.f. says about the plans of the last labor government. now, he raises the issue of growth. >> order! >> it is not acceptable to shout down either the prime minister or the leader of the opposition and the public have a very low opinion of that kind of behavior. let's hear the questions and hear the answers. the prime minister? >> he raises the issue of america and american growth. the fact is our recession was longer and deeper than the recession in america. the biggest banking bust was not an american bank, it was a british bank. they want to talk about tomorrow because he doesn't want to talk about yesterday when the two people responsible for the regulation of the bank and the performance of our economy are sitting right there on the opposition benches. >> once again, a completely incompensable answer, mr. speaker. i
. . it is not broke. our priorities are broken. there is a misplaced obsession with debt and deficits as the national emergency of our time. that has driven the story line inside the beltway. we did a story on how the austerity cost rules washington. it is a portrait of think tanks, philanthropists and others who have framed in a way so it is hard to tell an alternative story. that has shifted a little because of new voices and forces emerging from the 99% or what ever you want to call it. >> you had better have twitter and facebook involved in the project. >> we do, absolutely. we have all kinds of new media. i agree you need to use all of that. it has been a very powerful force. we use all of that at "the nation. " we have a correspondent right about this in a politically. at occupy wall street in new york a few miles from our office, one thing that struck our correspondent was how many young people came to the square and were caught up in conversations, talking to people and the general assembly's, conversations. so many people have lived in front of their laptop or been part of the new media that
there is a better way to reduce the deficit. he's calling for cuts and reforms that will put us on the path to balancing the budget within ten years. you can see it live. we're keeping an eye on the white house. we'll bring you the president's remarks as soon as he gets to the podium. >>> we are tracking a developing story on new details from the justice department that seem to lay out its case for killing u.s. citizens if they're determined to be a terror risk. the memo first reported by nbc addresses issues raised after recent drone strikes including the one that killed american born al-qaeda leader, but now a bi-partisan group of senators says it wants to know why they were never briefed on what is apparently new presidential authority. chief intelligence correspondent kathryn her image is live with more. >> reporter: this letter signed by eight democrats and three republicans urges mr. obama to produce a highly classified memo that authorized the targeted killing program so that, quote, congress and the public can decide whether the president's power to deliberately kill american citize
are in for a massive and unsustainable increasing deficit if we don't get a handle on entitlements. good morning. glad to have you with us. gregg: the cbo is saying it deficit will go down to $840 billion. that's the first time it will drop a trillion dollars under president obama. martha: but with baby boomers retiring at the rate of 10,000 people a day. entitlement spending is set to explode. stuart, as we pointed out, there is a lot of enthusiasm that we won't rack up a trillion dollar deficit. >> reporter: the headline was all about the deficit is going to be below a trillion dollars. that's great news. the bad news and there is a lot of it. the next 10 years medicare will cost $1 trillion a year. obama-care subsidies will total nearly a trillion dollars. the cost of medicaid will double and the debt will go to the highest portion of tour economy than it's been in a generation. there is dismal views on the current state of the economy. 1.4% growth this year and the unemployment rate will rise at 8% and stay that way for years to come. martha: the cbo makes very clear we need to do some entitlement
the budget deficit will drop below $1 trillion for the first time during obama's presidency. the congressional budget office which assumes that federal spending cuts will go into effect march 1st says the government will run a deficit of $845 billion this year compared to last year's $1.1 trillion shortfall. but the cbo's ten-year outlook predicts those improvements will not last. it warns that an aging population will drive up entitlement spending and rising interest rates will put the debt at unsustainable levels. if current laws remain in place, debt by 2023 only ten years from now will equal 77% of gdp. that's roughly double the 39% average seen over the past 40 years. >>> and president obama is asking lawmakers to take quick action as a march 1st deadline approaches that will trigger deep spending cuts. "the new york times" writes this morning that "mr. obama, who missed a deadline this week to submit his annual budget to congress, acknowledged on tuesday that a broader deficit agreement is unlikely to be reached by the march deadline. he provided no details about the t
the deficit automatically picks up because there's slow revenue coming in and there's the need to spend on programs to help ease us through a slow period. it was wise policy, wise policy. >> bob, what do you think? >> well, i agree with laura that a better policy would be to put these cuts into entitlement reform and have them occur over time rather than immediately and abruptly, but it doesn't seem like the other side it s willing to engage in discussion of entitlement reform right now, so maybe we need to go ahead and do what we have to do and then keep the negotiations open. >> is that the issue then, laura? since we can't come to a deal when the republicans feel like they have leverage, they have got to do it when they can do it? >> i honestly don't think so. we have elections coming up in two years. i've heard republican members of the hill saying that this is what the public wants, the public wants a sequester. the public doesn't want a sequester. when the public realizes what a sequester means for jobs in their community, for education programs in their community, for the fact th
and uninsured health costs. the shortfall the average savings deficit for a single female is little over $133,000. that's the additional amount a single female would on average need to save by age 65 to eliminate the shortfall. the recent economic crisis has made it even more difficult. the low contribution rates and the lack of understanding of the need for the comprehensive retirement strategy means inadequate income for the rest of your life. these issues are compounded in addition to living longer older women are likely to have costly chronic medical conditions and need longer-term institutional care. further women are likely to be single at some point in their lives which puts them at a high risk for poverty and it is an irony of the latest stage of life many women become poor for the first time in their life. today the rate of harmony for women 65 and over is close to 11%. in my testimony i have a lot more numbers but what i would like to point out is of those numbers once you get to single women almost a third and for the hispanic women it is 44% which is just the enormous. another twi
sent him a message. the symbolic vote he detail how he would cut the deficit to avoid the automatic spending cuts next month. >> mr. president, you missed the deadline again. let's see your plan. let's show it to the american people and have the discussion about the proper way to manage down this debt and deficit. >> reporter: without a budget deal on march 1st so-called sequestration will force reductions in military training, cutbacks in operations, and layoffs of civilian pentagon employees plus civilian defense contractors. >> it's an idiotic management nightmare to try to run a complex sophisticated, long-term program when you have short-term, massive cuts. >> reporter: deep cuts also loom in social services. outgoing defense secretary panetta slammed democrats and republicans for their game of chicken. >> let's see how bad it can get in order to have the other party blink. >> reporter: some senate republicans today said push the deadline back seven months. but house speaker john boehner said in effect he will not blink. >> at some point, washington has to deal with its spendin
. in addition, deal than the u.s. government cannot massive deficits is because the federal reserve's ability to play funny. today the federal reserve couldn't print money. no time at interest rates with me. i don't think the u.s. could -- and would not be creditworthy if you couldn't print money. that creates a huge temptation for politicians. republicans and democrats. i don't think whether disciplined fiscal policy until monetary policy. the recent financial crisis. in the late 1990s, early 2000, alan greenspan had been there long time, wanted to be a hero. he was getting ready to retire for having the minor correction. greenspan was going to be good note, so he starts lowering interest rates, the effect to printing money. it creates negative real interest rate. so you can borrow dramatically less than the appreciation rate of housing, which incentive a huge investment house in which a prayer at such low interest rates. in right at the end of his term, greenspan realizes he's screwed up and he and his successors to raising interest rates very rapidly and create something: inverted joker. a
washington journal they talk about the recent article suggesting that a trust deficit by americans toward government and financial sector could be holding back the economic recovery. my cartoons depict can da that and humor. why started the cartoon, they were native characters and native situations. and my audience was geared toward natives. in the last four or five years they have become more universal where they stilled to the mainstream dominant culture. it's more universal now. i'm inspired by the people that are that i grew up with. my friend, my family, members of my tribe. and basically watching people and some of the things they do. it's surprising, if you pay attention to what people do and what people say, there's a lot of humor you can find in that, you know, making your own twists and certain things. >> people who have read my cartoons for the first time. i hope they take with them the appreciation of a native culture and native way of life. because it's not always depicted correctly in cinema or in books. but this cartoon coming from a genuine native american and these are my
spending, investments in military power, reinvest it elsewhere. not so much cut the deficit, but use the money saved for his priorities, his domestic priorities. closer? >> yeah. >> okay. >> oh, no, i just want the mic back. closer to me. this is the problem with us having three mics, and i apologize. tom, i just want to push you on a question and then actually segway to fred to talk about the wars we theoretically can fight. part of the problem is the notion that we don't have wars that we want to fight, and that is in some ways an acceptable notion. a man who was elected as commander and chief, and he gets to make those decisions. the american people voted him into office, and in some ways the president is absolutely right to suggest that he has a mandate in these areas. the real question is the impact that these decisions have on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history, we don't talk about this very much, we have maintained a strong military not so that we can fight, but so that we cannot fight. and the other point i think that tom made and this is
and labor leaders and then separately with business leaders. they're talking about the economy and deficit reduction. but also in the context of how does immigration affect that? the president said he wants to do something about the 11 million people who are living and working in this country and have been doing so for years illegally. but republicans here, especially conservatives on the house side, want to make sure border protection comes first. janet napolitano is touring the border right now and says we can secure it but we can't completely shut it down because that would hinder trade and commerce. also today the house judiciary committee meeting. they take a look at what might be the best solution here. there's a group of democrats and republicans working behind the scenes to come up with a solution. no word yet on how much progress they've made. >> interesting. tracie potts, thank you. >>> nbc news has obtained a confidential justice department memo that contains the legal justification for drone strikes on american citizens. the document from the justice department says the governm
's fiscal uncertainty and is doing so nervously. >> we have massive deficit, big tax increase. no apparent willingness to get government off people's backs by reducing government spending. all of that is a heavy weight on the private sector. firms around the nation are sitting on their cash instead of creating jobs. >> on wednesday, the commerce department announced economic growth fell to a minus tenth of a percent, the last three months of last year. so the chairman of the president's council of economic advisors says other indicators remain positive. >> consumer spending increased. business investment; particularly, for equipment and software was strong. residential construction was strong. we are seeing signs of that in the jobs report. >> it also showed a larger number of people dropped out of the labor force than found jobs. former administration economist says some of that is to be expected. >> the population is aging, so we expect to have a fair number of people retiring every month for the next ten years or more as the baby boom is retiring. >> actually, the conference board repor
. let's reform the defense budget and look at the largest drivers of our deficit in mandate spending programs those on the left end of the spectrum don't want to cut. >>brian: they took gates cuts and are going try to up them by $500 billion. leon panetta takes over from them. has the same fear. here's what he said yesterday on "meet the press." >> we've got a plan for that possibility because there are so many members saying we're going to let it take place, but i have to tell you it is irresponsible for it to happen. i mean, why -- why in god's name would members of congress elected by the american people take a step that would badly damage our national defense, but more importantly undermine the support for our men and women in uniform? why would you do that? >>brian: that is inaccurate. it is the president who proposed these sequester cuts. this isn't congress doing that. and republican fear about these cuts, would you say that's accurate? >> i would say it's accurate. there is a growing resignation to them on the hill for some reason. i was there two weeks ago. everyone seems re
to an education. >> it was specially made, custom plate over the deficit in her skull which is this sort of size in the entrance. and, left-hand side of her skull. >> reporter: wow, the outspoken activist not giving up on her dreams to help others. her determination even stronger after outpouring of support she experienced following her injuries. >> because of these prayers god has given me this new life. and this is a second life. this is a new life. you want to serve. i want to serve the people. and i want every girl, every child to be educated. >> reporter: i love this little girl. malala's latest surgery restored her hearing with a cock letter implant. she will do so with a newly formed found decision, the malala fund, $10 million strong courtesy of pakistan. jon? jon: she is amazing, wow. >> reporter: so are the doctors. good for her. jon: jamie colby, thank you. jenna: new orleans was enjoying its moment in the national spotlight when suddenly the superdome plunged into darkness. the power outage putting the super bowl on hold for more than half an hour. what could cause a blackout right i
or not tall from the standpoint of the deficit. the second point i want to make is in line with what bob said. if you were to make a typology of a foreign policy challenges of the united states, it might go something like this. there are crises that involve the of the values and the interest and the interests but not the values and both with some overlap. we pursue our interests hopefully not the point that we are right of a moral crisis that we generate. there are certain challenges which do not seem to involve our interests very much but to bring our values and to question and the classic example of that would have been rwanda and i will get back to that in a moment and then there was a majority of foreign policy challenges. syria and given the magnitude of the humanitarian crisis, the strategic importance of the country there is no greater blow that can be dealt to iran at this moment than the fall of the assad regime from there is no greater blow that can be dealt to hezbollah are dealt to hamas the in the fall of the regime. if one wants to be a coldhearted realist and put together of th
a $16 trillion deficit, 51 million people on food stamps. our culture is an entitlement culture and yet we're going after 13 million people who have an immigration problem. hey, i'm all for vetting them. how about reverse discrimination for once in this country. if we're going to demand exceptionalism, we should have it towards the immigrants whether they come legally or illegally and also go back to americans who are u.s. citizens. >> are you talking about expelling americans? >> i'm all for demotion of citizenship. i agree with you. it may be extreme. but here's my point. how many of you. >> keep it short. >> how many of you have a trouble in a third world country and you come back to america and have a different experience about exceptionalism. what about reverse immigration? >> i do not support the deportation of american citizens but if that were to be a policy, what you would do is save hundreds of billions of dollars a year in the welfare state because immigrants are less likely to use welfare each when naturalized and americans who are poor. that's an interesting result of that.
in the right direction. but midway through that cut that back and went back to spending cuts and deficit reductions. critics say basically if they would have left it alone, if they would have left the economy alone it would have righted its own ship. the massive government spending of world war ii, that sucked a lot of people back into labor market at a terrible humanitarian cost got the economy back running. host: there have been some folks, part of the administration, part of the democrats that say infusing money and coming up with these stimulus projects will help get the economy going. is this a similar situation to what f.d.r. tried to do coming out of the great depression? guest: threrp definitely parallels between the stimulus law of 2009 and what f.d.r. wanted to do. one major difference was where the stimulus sort of relied on the private sector. they had is civilian conservation core. this time they've tried to put money into contracts that private firms will get and then hopefully hire private workers. i think the thing about the stimulus is i bet 80 years from now we'll be de
of this administration is the lack of priority and funding for the military. while they've increased the deficit by $5.3 trillion in four years, the only major part of the budget has been decreased is the military. that's something pretty well- known. a lot of people don't like that idea. the thing that bothers me just as much is putting the agenda, another agenda under the military budget. for example, you have heard senator mccain and me and others talk about the fact that the navy paid for 450,000 gallons of fuel, some $26 a gallon. you can get it on the market for $3. the air force, same thing. except it's $59 a gallon. and so the question i would have of you is just a commitment that if you are confirmed, will you confine the dollars that we are going to spend in the defense budget for defense purposes, for war-fighting purposes? >> well, of course i will because that's the intent of our budget and department of defense. >> i appreciate that very much. there was an article the other day in "the washington post" by jennifer ruben called, "our dim witted state department." it's kind of an interesti
's a little schizophrenia going on. a lot of folks think we need to cut and solve the deficit and now when we face cuts and face austerity, it's very difficult. the bottom line is that because of the divided government, it's very difficult for there to be a global solution that would, you know, make a lot of rationale sense. and, instead, we're facing a series of cuts like the sequester that although they look disorganized are slowly getting us towards a more balanced budget. i think the markets have pretty much digested the fact that the sequester is likely. i doubt that it will have a significant impact on the markets because i think everybody already knows it's likely to happen. >> this goes back, again, to one of your concerns. certainly a concern for a lot of people in the u.s., which is where is the middle any more inspect and it's interesting because in your career you've switched parties. explain that move. are there going to be any more like you? >> well, you know, i used to be a moderate republican and now it's a moderate democrat. but the truth is, there aren't very many moderates
be raised again. >> how a template of a increasing the deficit in effect the economy and financial markets? >> where do you know the answer. it's sort of jan at the bill and i went to expect this. when initially proposed, some analysts say it's for uncertain, we can't keep raising the debt limit for threatening to default after a few. so far it's not cause the latter can turn. the next thing we have to worry about is the sequestration has, which baumbach $85 billion in the remainder of this fiscal year and that hates march 1st. then we've got another deadline on march 27. so at this point, those things are more likely to damage the economy in the short term than this bill. although could play russian roulette later this summer, and that's going to be a problem as well. spoon mixture into the "washington post," thank you. >> thanks. >> she loved being first lady. she got the job for less than a year, but it was julie tyler who ordered the marines to play out to the chief of the president appears, a custom we still follow. subject to more criticism, greeted her guests on a throne on a raised
where we extol the virtues of good business and fiscal policy and we fight the deficit and we don't advocate the printing of money in obscene amounts just to cover our debts. we have to rein in entitlements. >> steve: look at that! you've already got your stump speech down. if you do run for senate, though, you can't be on tv or the radio. >> you know, the senate race is still a good year away, steve. so i've got some time to hone a message, get around and ride my harley to all parts of garden state. >> steve: look, i think brian's got a campaign -- >> i hope i can count on brian. >> brian: a new bumper sticker. >> gretchen: are you going to do it? >> i very well may. erica and i are talking about it. remember, i believe in immigration reform. i believe in gay rights and gay marriage. i believe in choice. not obscenely, but i believe in roe v wade. so you have to take my fiscal positions on being a republican who believes that we have to bail out future generations rather than in debt future generations with some of these social policies that aren't in sync with traditional politi
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)

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